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The Deep Insights into Japanese Cuisine

Learn all about Japanese cuisine and hospitality in Savor Japan's in-depth videos.
The more you know, the more interesting it becomes.

Taste of SAKURA - The Deep Insights into Japanese Cuisine Vol.1
3:23

Taste of SAKURA
The Deep Insights into Japanese Cuisine Vol.1
Shunsai Oguraya

Decorating Simplicity - The Deep Insights into Japanese Cuisine Vol.2
3:03

Decorating Simplicity
The Deep Insights into Japanese Cuisine Vol.2
Shunsai Oguraya

Rotary Cutting - The Deep Insights into Japanese Cuisine Vol.3
2:07

Rotary Cutting
The Deep Insights into Japanese Cuisine Vol.3
Shunsai Oguraya

Seasoning of Spring - The Deep Insights into Japanese Cuisine Vol.4
3:50

Seasoning of Spring
The Deep Insights into Japanese Cuisine Vol.4
Shunsai Oguraya

Restaurant or Museum? - The Deep Insights into Japanese Cuisine Vol.5
2:16

Restaurant or Museum?
The Deep Insights into Japanese Cuisine Vol.5
Shunsai Oguraya

Saving the Fragrance - The Deep Insights into Japanese Cuisine Vol.6
2:52

Saving the Fragrance
The Deep Insights into Japanese Cuisine Vol.6
Japanese Cuisine Wakyo

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Japanese Dining Etiquette

Polish your Japanese table manners with tutoring from experts.
Impress your friends with your knowledge and skills.

Kaiseki (course menu)
07.15.2016
5:00
How to eat

Kaiseki (course menu)
Ginza Koju
Toru Okuda

Kaiseki (course menu)
07.15.2016
3:19
Culture & History

Kaiseki (course menu)
Ginza Koju
Toru Okuda

Kaiseki (course menu)
07.15.2016
4:33
The Skill

Kaiseki (course menu)
Ginza Koju
Toru Okuda

Okonomiyaki
07.15.2016
3:16
How to eat

Okonomiyaki
Okonomiyaki Kiji Shinagawa
Eri Nakagawa

Okonomiyaki
07.15.2016
3:11
Culture & History

Okonomiyaki
Okonomiyaki Kiji Shinagawa
Eri Nakagawa

Okonomiyaki
07.15.2016
3:09
The Skill

Okonomiyaki
Okonomiyaki Kiji Shinagawa
Eri Nakagawa

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Discover Oishii Japan

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Chef directory

Finding an excellent chef with tastes that match your own is essential to fully enjoying your dining experience in Japan. Why not compare the backgrounds and philosophies of many of Japan's finest chefs in interviews presented by Savor Japan.

On the menu

TFood grudges run deep
RECOMMENDED

Food grudges run deep

This phrase is often printed on Oumi -beef bento lunch boxes sold at train stations throughout Japan. It expresses the deep resentment of hungry samurai when Ii Naosuke, Tokugawa Shogun遯カ蜀ア Chief Advisor and lord of Oumi (now part of Shiga Prefecture) refused to present the Edo government with Oumi beef. According to folklore, his refusal even contributed to his assassination in the 1860 Sakuradamon incident.
The Oumi beef label only graces beef from kuroge-wagyu (Japanese black cattle) that spent most of their lives raised in Shiga Prefecture. Compared with Japan's other two major wagyu brands (Matsuzaka and Kobe), Oumi has a much longer history and meltier-in-your-mouth texture.

Bonito. The fish that never stops swimming.
RECOMMENDED

Bonito. The fish that never stops swimming.

Bonito never stop swimming, which may partially explain their super meaty bodies. The best-tasting bonito are the hatsu-gatsuo (first bonito) harvested in April and May. But returning bonito, or modori-gatsuo, caught off the Sanriku coast in August and September are also delicious.
Bonito meat is flavorful and full of beneficial DHA for the brain, taurine for the liver, EPA, Vitamin B12, Vitamin D and potassium. Japanese lightly grill it as tataki or dry it for use as flakes in wide-ranging dishes that play an essential role in Japanese culinary tradition. They also eat bonito raw as sashimi in various styles - with soy sauce and shoga (ginger), myoga (Japanese ginger buds), salt, ponzu (citrus-based sauce) or yuzukosho (citrus paste and pepper). While visiting Japan, we recommend trying lightly grilled bonito tataki at least once.

The king of Japanese mushrooms. Matsutake.
RECOMMENDED

The king of Japanese mushrooms. Matsutake.

Wonderfully aromatic and unforgettably delicious, Matsutake is one of Japan's renowned autumn foods. It is also, unfortunately, expensive because it is harvested in the wild and difficult to find. The price varies every year between several thousand and tens of thousands of yen, depending on the size of the annual harvest.
When cooked, matsutake radiates a fresh, distinctive aroma that is loved by Japanese. It can be prepared in various ways, such as in soups, on rice, in hotpots, steamed, charbroiled, in sukiyaki or in tempura. The most popular way to enjoy its seasonal autumn aroma is by steaming it in an earthenware teapot as dobinmushi.

Japanese food glossary

Japanese enjoy foods in season.
Learn about the seasonality of Japanese ingredients.

Japanese food glossary

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