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Important Notice from SAVOR JAPAN

From July 23, 2018, we will provide restaurant reservation services in Traditional Chinese, Simplified Chinese and Korean in addition to continuing to provide English services, with a reservation fee of 540 JPY (tax included) per group reservation.

We look forward to your continued support.

Thank you.

Feature Stories

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The Deep Insights into Japanese Cuisine

Learn all about Japanese cuisine and hospitality in Savor Japan's in-depth videos.
The more you know, the more interesting it becomes.

Taste of SAKURA - The Deep Insitghts into Japanese Cuisine Vol.1
3:23

Taste of SAKURA
The Deep Insitghts into Japanese Cuisine Vol.1
Shunsai Oguraya

Decorating Simplicity - The Deep Insitghts into Japanese Cuisine Vol.2
3:03

Decorating Simplicity
The Deep Insitghts into Japanese Cuisine Vol.2
Shunsai Oguraya

Rotary Cutting - The Deep Insitghts into Japanese Cuisine Vol.3
2:07

Rotary Cutting
The Deep Insitghts into Japanese Cuisine Vol.3
Shunsai Oguraya

Seasoning of Spring - The Deep Insitghts into Japanese Cuisine Vol.4
3:50

Seasoning of Spring
The Deep Insitghts into Japanese Cuisine Vol.4
Shunsai Oguraya

Restaurant or Museum? - The Deep Insitghts into Japanese Cuisine Vol.5
2:16

Restaurant or Museum?
The Deep Insitghts into Japanese Cuisine Vol.5
Shunsai Oguraya

Saving the Fragrance - The Deep Insitghts into Japanese Cuisine Vol.6
2:52

Saving the Fragrance
The Deep Insitghts into Japanese Cuisine Vol.6
Japanese Cuisine Wakyo

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Japanese Dining Etiquette

Polish your Japanese table manners with tutoring from experts.
Impress your friends with your knowledge and skills.

Kaiseki (course menu)
07.15.2016
5:00
How to eat

Kaiseki (course menu)
Ginza Koju
Toru Okuda

Kaiseki (course menu)
07.15.2016
3:19
Culture & History

Kaiseki (course menu)
Ginza Koju
Toru Okuda

Kaiseki (course menu)
07.15.2016
4:33
The Skill

Kaiseki (course menu)
Ginza Koju
Toru Okuda

Okonomiyaki
07.15.2016
3:16
How to eat

Okonomiyaki
Okonomiyaki Kiji Shinagawa
Eri Nakagawa

Okonomiyaki
07.15.2016
3:11
Culture & History

Okonomiyaki
Okonomiyaki Kiji Shinagawa
Eri Nakagawa

Okonomiyaki
07.15.2016
3:09
The Skill

Okonomiyaki
Okonomiyaki Kiji Shinagawa
Eri Nakagawa

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Discover Oishii Japan

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Chef directory

Finding an excellent chef with tastes that match your own is essential to fully enjoying your dining experience in Japan. Why not compare the backgrounds and philosophies of many of Japan's finest chefs in interviews presented by Savor Japan.

On the menu

The perfect fish for summer festivals. Hamo.
RECOMMENDED

The perfect fish for summer festivals. Hamo.

Hamo (pike conger) dishes are commonly served in the latter half of July during the Gion festival in Kyoto and Tenjin festival in Osaka - two of western Japan's three major annual festivals. Since hamo stays alive in warm water, even under the scorching sun, it was just about the only fish served fresh in Kyoto and Osaka before modern transportation arrived. This made it a favorite dish at summer festivals.
Hamo is mainly caught offshore in western Japan. It looks much like unagi (eel) or anago (conger eel), but has a lighter meat that is easier to eat. The most common summer recipe for hamo is yubiki, which is lightly simmered with plum meat. When deboned and lightly boiled, the meat curves back like a flower petal as shown in the photo. Hamo is both delicious and nutritious, bringing joyous relief to revelers in the summer heat.

Karei. One of Japan's flat-out favorites.
RECOMMENDED

Karei. One of Japan's flat-out favorites.

Light and tasty, containing little oil but plenty of stress-releasing vitamin B1, karei (flounder) is a favorite among men and women of all ages throughout Japan. The lightness of the meat makes it popular among the sick and elderly, and women love it for the fullness of its skin-beautifying collagen. The most common recipe for karei, which is mainly harvested in Hokkaido, is a sweet and rich simmered dish called nitsuke. The fins of karei, known as engawa, are a delicacy when served raw as sushi. Visitors to Japan are encouraged to try delicious karei at least once during their stay.

The chicken worthy of a hero's last meal.
RECOMMENDED

The chicken worthy of a hero's last meal.

According to tradition, shamo chicken was originally brought to Japan in the early Edo era from Siam (Thailand) as a fighting breed. It was later bred for poultry, creating a meat that is highly nutritious and loaded with protein. Legend has it that one of Japan's most popular historical figures, Ryoma Sakamoto, stated his desire to eat shamo chicken before dying from a mortal wound. Shamo chicken lovers are especially fond of hot pot recipes, which give the meat a delightful texture both crunchy and chewy.

Japanese food glossary

Japanese enjoy foods in season.
Learn about the seasonality of Japanese ingredients.

Japanese food glossary

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